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Striking the ball too hard too often, trying to bring a high ball down out of the air, or too many tight direction changes these are all common contributors to groin problems. With groin injuries, as with most, there are different types and severities, from minimal (grade 1) pulls to serious (grade 3) tears. 

Whilst you can’t eliminate the risk entirely the good news is that, again like with most types of injury, there are things that we can be doing to reduce the risk. Read our top five tips that you can implement into your routine to reduce your risk of a groin injury.

Have you ever wondered what a professional footballer’s work day is really like? In this short article we catch up with West Ham nutritionist Matt Jones to talk about the ins and outs of training, fitness tests, food, and everybody’s favourite, the ice bath!

While you may put your heart and soul into playing football, you are doing your potential a huge disservice if you don’t put as much thought into your nutrition.

Here are five reasons why nutrition should be something you care about as a footballer:

Soft tissue injuries such as muscle strains have unfortunately grown in prevalence in recent months, perhaps owing to fixture congestion and minimal recovery and preparation due to the COVID pandemic. Ankle and knee injuries are also common, and you can’t overlook the debilitating effects of the common cold.

Whilst there is no way to prevent all injuries in a contact sport such as football, below we cover five key points to help you reduce your risk of injury and improve your recovery process in the event that you are injured.

Whether you’re a Sunday league player or Lionel Messi, ensuring that you eat the correct foods in the hours following a match or hard training session is essential for good recovery. 
Our guide to your post match nutrition needs

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