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We spoke with the head nutritionist at AS Monaco to discuss the importance of good nutrition for footballers, the nutritional challenges faced by a top flight teams  and how Soccer Supplement® products help keep the players on top form.

The art of football training is a broad topic that involves many aspects, although we can break it down into three main branches: Physical, Technical and Tactical.

All three overlap in many ways, but by understanding each of them more clearly, we can see what we need to work on to improve our individual game.

In this article we explore each of these training concepts in a little more depth, to give you a better understanding of what they encompass and how to make the most of them to develop your game.

As you lay those football cones on the ground, allow the words of Sir Bobby Robson to echo in your mind – ‘practice makes permanent’.

The truth is that any player can learn a skill; the only way to embed these skills into your game is to practice them until they are automatic. This is why football drills are imperative to the success of both a player and their team, from under 5s to Champions League.

In this article we look at some basic football training drills that you and your teammates can practice and adapt to improve your game.

In this blog post we put some questions to West Ham nutritionist Matt Jones, asking him about how a player can correctly hydrate during football training sessions, and how this can be tailored to suit the weather, their on-field position, body composition and training routine.

It is said that it takes 10,000 hours to achieve greatness in a discipline, whether that’s piano, golf or – in our case – football. 

Elite professional footballers have undoubtedly put in their 10,000+ hours, although the vast majority of that takes place when the cameras are off; on the training ground, in the gym and in the classroom.

Whatever your level, training is crucial for footballers wanting to reach their potential and take their game further. Whether you are a player, a coach or a parent, in this article we dissect the world of football training and give you everything you need to know to make the most of it.

We caught up with West Ham nutritionist Matt Jones to talk about the role nutrition plays in the squad, and how diet and supplementation can help footballers from the Premier League® to the Sunday league prepare for, fuel and recover from their matches. Read on to find out more about nutrition in top flight football, so that you can apply the same principles to your game.

This winter has been tougher than usual for most of us, and there is no shame in having gained a little weight. Here are five suggestions as to how you can lose that excess weight in a sustainable way.

Pro footballers are known for some strange pre-match habits – whether that’s being the last player to walk onto the pitch, cutting holes in the back of their socks, or kissing their goalkeeper’s bald head. 

Yet, one thing that every professional footballer does before, during and after football is hydrate properly. This is one habit that every Sunday league player should copy.

Good hydration is crucial. The average footballer is likely to lose 1.1 litres of water through sweat during a game; often more. Without replenishing yourself with enough fluid, you risk varying degrees of dehydration – when your body does not have enough water to do its job.

Understanding the how and the why of supplementing your energy supply throughout your matchdays is critical if you are to truly maximise your abilities when it counts. All of the sprinting, jumping, accelerating and decelerating will take a significant toll on your carbohydrate stores, hydration levels and branch chain amino acids (BCAA). Some of the more common side effects of depleting these are tiredness, reduced physical and cognitive performance, and in more serious cases injury. A sound, personalised strategy for your matchdays will ensure you are never left wanting for extra energy during the 90 minutes. To start to put that strategy together, first you must understand the types of energy your body will need pre, during and post matches.

Food provides us with macronutrients, fibre, micronutrients and water. The macronutrients carbohydrate, protein and fat get most of the attention, so let’s take a deeper look at micronutrients.

Micronutrients are small nutrients, including vitamins and minerals that do not provide energy, but do contribute significantly to our health and performance, and support many physiological processes, and play important roles in growth and development, and supporting metabolic and enzymatic reactions at rest and during exercise.

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